Oh Tannen-gone Oh Tannen-gone how lovely are your branches

By on Dec 24, 2016 in New Year |

The holidays are over and you are now faced with a couple of decisions. When do I get rid of the Christmas tree and what do I do with it? This of course is an easy decision if the tree is life-like, find the storage container and pack it away for another season. If it’s a fresh cut tree you need to take action soon. Good thing you resolved to be a better pro-active decision maker as a New Year’s resolution. Here are some things to ponder as you wander through your living space considering your next move. 1. I suggest the purchase of a nice foliage houseplant. A Schefflera or Ficus will motivate you to fill the space. It will also clean your indoor air in the next few months as we “plow” through the remaining winter season. 2. Many cities and municipalities offer a drop off site and in some cases pick up for your tree. This is a good choice because they have the equipment to recycle...

Hoe Hoe Hoe

By on Nov 2, 2013 in Christmas |

The landscape provides a bounty of holiday decorating opportunities with entry porch pots to welcome visitors to your home. Flowers now frozen in pots can be pulled and you can create warm welcoming containers in existing pots that I call “porch pots” for the holiday season. Hoe, Hoe, Hoe, let your landscape add to the festive look of the holidays. Start with some containers for your deck or entry steps. I like to use ceramic pots that were used for flowering annuals during the growing season. In November before the soil freezes hard, branches cut at a 45 degree angle to create a point can be pushed into the soil to arrange your festive welcome. If you’re potting up some new containers make sure to have some bags of thawed potting soil stored for use for when you’re ready to arrange. After your arrangement is made and left outdoors the soil will freeze and hold the branches in place....

Make your Christmas “Greens” come true!

By on Dec 3, 2011 in Christmas |

When it comes to your Christmas tree it’s not much different than a tree in your landscape…..it needs “re-hydration” when nature calls so to speak. Foliage or in this case needles transpire like people perspire when things warm up. In the case of an evergreen they’ll transpire indoors when you turn up the heat. Due to a decrease in hydrostatic water pressure in the needles as they transpire the tree “pulls” water upward through the xylem to re-hydrate the tree. The same applies to trees and plants in your landscape. The big difference of course is that the Christmas tree in your living room has no roots to reach out. You have to reach out and provide the water to your tree so the “FMC” does not drop to unacceptable levels at which point “yule” have to reach for a vacuum cleaner. FMC is Foliage Moisture Content. Make a...

Needlecast

By on Apr 29, 2011 in Trees |

Needlecast is not a new on-line broadcast of sarcastic comedians……..it is a fungus that might be affecting your evergreen trees. The fungus Rhizosphaera Needlecast causes browning and premature needle drop on Spruce and Pines. Browning of the needles is apparent in early spring. Here is a picture of Needlecast sent to me from my friend Brian McKenzie at Bartlett Tree Experts. Often diagnosed as “winter damage” the problem tends to appear first on lower branches. I’m convinced this is because the lower branches are the wettest and most shaded part of the evergreen tree. Fruiting spores are spread by spring rain to other needles including those that are newly formed. Stressed trees that are not properly cared for (feeding and water) are most susceptible. Remove infected limbs and fallen needles in early spring. Overstory trees in close proximity to these...