Grass grows best where you wish it wouldn’t

By on May 25, 2011 in Weeding by example |

I’ve got grass growing in my __________ (you fill in the blank). Usually the grass is growing in a ground cover or in the middle of a rose bush. It seems to be true that grass grows best where you wish it wouldn’t. I myself have become an expert on a sunny calm wind-less day with a brush or directed pin-point nozzle on a pressure tank sprayer and a little bit of Roundup. The danger is that Roundup or glyphosate is a “non-selective” herbicide i.e. kills whatever vegetation it hits. To the inexperienced gardener trying to deal with grass growing between plants it can result in involuntary plant slaughter. In some cases brushing it on the offending grasses…..well let’s just say you’ve got better things to do with your time……take me to your “weeder”. There are some products that are considered an “over-the-top”...

What the world weeds now..is lawn sweet lawn….

By on Jun 9, 2010 in Weeding by example |

What the world weeds now…is lawn sweet lawn….not exactly the lyrics of Burt Bacharach and his 1965 hit. The liberties with the lyrics however does point out our love for our lawns and landscapes and the simultaneous battle we wage against weeds. As Austin Powers would say… “Oh behave” as he and Elizabeth Hurley dance to the music of Burt Bacharach in Austin Powers International Man of Mystery…… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dh7n7_DJZxM Just the other day I was approached by someone with their sandwich baggie stuffed with weeds. They were ready to “throw in the trowel” on their yard and landscape due to the invasion of a weed taking over their landscape. She said at home they refer to this invasive weed as “Taliban” weed.  Her husband had sent her to me for well rooted advice….take me to your “weeder”....

That’s just Dandy

By on Apr 12, 2010 in Weeding by example |

Early spring and warm temperatures cause rapid changes in the landscape. Some changes are just “dandy” and some are not….like anything else you take the good with the bad. The emergence of Daffodils, Magnolia and Forsythia blooms are a welcome sight after a long cold winter.This year’s unusually warm early spring weather has warmed soil temperatures quickly, some would argue 2 weeks ahead of schedule from where they would be in a normal season (if there is such a thing). Warm soil temperatures combined with some rainfall = weeds!  Weed killing season has come early to West Michigan. Those weeds in flower as of the second week of April 2010 are to name a few: Dandelions Common Chickweed Corn Speedwell Henbit Violets Shepards Purse Well isn’t that just dandy…..allow me to “weed by example” and get you at this point to walk to your calendar...

Maple Mess

By on Jun 4, 2008 in General, Weeding by example |

We all plan to rake Maple leaves in October, many looking forward to that season or time of the year. We don’t however plan to clean up “Maple Messes” in May or June? That’s right, “Maple Messes” with both falling leaves and twirling “helicopters” falling to earth with some years worse than others. Let’s start with the “helicopters” which are actually Samara, a type of fruit with a flattened wing of papery tissue. It’s the shape of a Samara that allows it to wing away in the wind from the parent tree to seed and grow where it lands. Isn’t nature a totally cool kick in the plants! In the case of Maple trees the balance of the seed on one side and the wing on the other makes them spiral as they fall creating the helicopter effect. The high number of falling Samaras raining down on your deck this year has...

Weeding by example

By on Apr 27, 2008 in Weeding by example |

                                                                                           Through the years there are many names that have been given to the dandelion, from lion’s tooth to clock flowers to puff balls. Some go so far as to call them “pee in the bed” flowers. I’m sure many who take pride in a well manicured lawn have had other names for them I can’t repeat here. My Dad who immigrated from Holland to the U.S. called them “American tulips.” Regardless of your name for dandelions, what Mom hasn’t enjoyed a bouquet of the yellow beauties from a child proud to hand them over. How about kids (or kids at heart) taking dried dandelion flowers and blowing them off the stem and into the air? The reality as I understand it is that the name dandelion is derived from the French for Dent de Lion or tooth of the lion. The dandelion has...