Wet Your Plants

By on Sep 11, 2009 in Wet your plants! |

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September is a month where irrigation, hoses and sprinklers become important elements to a successful garden. Even though Labor Day has passed and thoughts turn to fall, September can often be a dry and warm month. Butchart GardensSignificant damage can be done to landscape plants and turf in the fall if appropriate levels of natural rainfall are not present. Why would September rains or supplemental irrigation if needed be so important in the Fall? 3 primary reasons:

1) Fall is a time for root development in the landscape. Without sufficient moisture critical development and establishment of roots will be limited. 2) Plants need proper levels of moisture in their structure before dormancy. This is especially true of evergreens that will ride out the winter fully foliated subject to sun and wind without ability to draw from roots suspended in frozen soil. Exposed evergreens may need screening or anti-dessicant sprays applied. 3) Hatched grub larvae are actively feeding as they grow and can do significant damage to lawns in September and October if proper levels of moisture are not present. Don’t pack those hoses or winterize that irrigation system too soon. Get out there and “wet your plants!”

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